25 November 2010

Gifting

Often the simplest, humblest things make the best gifts.  The challenge for us, as humans with filters, preconceptions and biases, is to recognize the simple, humble thing as being a gift.  No easy task these days, when Thanksgiving is often over-commercialized as a day to "spend time with family and share good times and a meal", when what they really mean is a time for eating too much, watching football and then prepping for the Black Friday sales.  Because nothing says "I'm thankful" like a shopping spree one can't afford, to buy things you want for people you may not like.  And keep doing that all the way through the Twelve Days of Christmas.

Ah, I digress.  This was not meant as a Scroogey screed against one of the biggest holidays in America.

In the spirit of simple is better, I'll keep this short.  The best gift one can receive, in my opinion anyway, is one that often isn't dressed up in shiny finery.  It doesn't necessarily advertise itself, or stand out from the noise and clatter of everyday life.  It may even sidle up to you quietly, waiting patiently for you to notice...and when you do, you'll be forever grateful.

When others open up their lives to you, invite you in, break bread with you, no matter how humble or grand...this truly is worth the price of admission to be a human being.  Excess and consumerism pale in comparison, when you have the honor of sharing space, time and nourishment (for the body and the soul) with those who offer these things out of love.  Remember that, this holiday season.

Happy Thanksgiving, to my fellow humans.  May we share bread and salt.



Special thanks, and love, to The Missus and The Mister for the inspiration.

11 comments:

  1. First!! Oh, crap. Second! I'm definitely out of practice. Not that anyone plays this game anymore. I tip my hat, sir, to you. Not only for perfectly capturing what I believe to be the true sentiment of this holiday, but also this:

    You rhymed shiny and finery.

    Happy Thanksgiving.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanksgiving is such a nice holiday. After diwali, things go a little silent in this part of the world until Christmas

    ReplyDelete
  3. I hope that you have a good Thanksgiving. I am glad to keep the holiday free from a lot of malarkey--no football and no black Friday here, just basic good food and sharing with the people I love.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I hope you have a good Thanksgiving!

    You gave me a glimpse into your life earlier this year when I needed it the most, needed to know that it would get a little easier to bear. I can't tell you how much I appreciate it. I hope that today is good and peaceful and full of exceptional food, joy, and much love.

    I'm at my in-laws with a large group of great people, many of whom cook, and I doubt that the TV will go on at all. We don't go anywhere the day afterwards, either. :)

    Hope you are doing well!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Driving to the heart again with your finely honed words, K. :-)

    Wishing you love and gravy: Happy Thanksgiving!

    Pearl

    ReplyDelete
  6. And some good old Quebec maple syrup.

    ReplyDelete
  7. The best thing about the holidays, if you can wade through the cluttered wrappings of commercialism, is the time I get to spend with the people I care about most. Right now, I'm in Atlanta, where we did (ahem) just stuff ourselves. But that's okay, because we're so enjoying being together. And I get unlimited hugs. Nothin' better.

    ReplyDelete
  8. D'oh, I wasn't finished. It was all about me, wasn't it?

    I hope you're having a great Thanksgiving, Irish, and that you too are getting your fair share of good hugs.

    xo
    K*

    ReplyDelete
  9. This was lovely.
    We are so glad to have welcomed you into our home.

    ReplyDelete

"Let your laws come undone
Don't suffer your crimes
Let the love in your heart take control..."


-'The Hair Song', by Black Mountain

Tell me what is in your heart...